Difference between revisions of "Village Buildings bibliography"

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*Grant, Elizabeth, and Kelly Greenop, Albert L. Refiti, Daniel J. Glenn, eds (2018). ''The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture''. Springer, 2018. E-ISBN 9789811069048.<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Grant, Elizabeth, and Kelly Greenop, Albert L. Refiti, Daniel J. Glenn, eds (2018). ''The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture''. Springer, 2018. E-ISBN 9789811069048.<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Grenell, Peter (1972). "Planning for Invisible People: Some Consequences of Bureaucratic Values and Practices." In [Turner & Fichtel, eds, ''Freedom to Build'', 1972].&nbsp;<br/> Grenell notes in footnote "I am indebted to Cora Du Bois, Zemurray Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University (retired), for introducing me to the term 'invisible people.'"&nbsp;<br/> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;''"Both countries have severe housing problems in spite of the United States' great wealth and India's surfeit of manpower. Leaders of both nations believe these problems can be solved through modern technology and organization if sufficient resources are available. A fundamental consequence of this optimistic view is an underestimation of the variability and complexity of human needs, and also of the great resource represented by the people themselves....The result of these attitudes and their underlying values is to make people seem 'invisible' to those persons -- chiefly members of large bureaucratic organizations -- whose professed task is to serve them. It is only when invisible people have made their presence felt, through political agitation or sheer force of numbers, that governments have been compelled to recognize their existence and to institute new or revised goals and programs. This is as true in India with its islands of affluence amidst a sea of poverty, as it is in the United States with its pockets of poverty in almost university plenty."&nbsp;''<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Grenell, Peter (1972). "Planning for Invisible People: Some Consequences of Bureaucratic Values and Practices." In [Turner & Fichtel, eds, ''Freedom to Build'', 1972].&nbsp;<br/> Grenell notes in footnote "I am indebted to Cora Du Bois, Zemurray Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University (retired), for introducing me to the term 'invisible people.'"&nbsp;<br/> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;''"Both countries have severe housing problems in spite of the United States' great wealth and India's surfeit of manpower. Leaders of both nations believe these problems can be solved through modern technology and organization if sufficient resources are available. A fundamental consequence of this optimistic view is an underestimation of the variability and complexity of human needs, and also of the great resource represented by the people themselves....The result of these attitudes and their underlying values is to make people seem 'invisible' to those persons -- chiefly members of large bureaucratic organizations -- whose professed task is to serve them. It is only when invisible people have made their presence felt, through political agitation or sheer force of numbers, that governments have been compelled to recognize their existence and to institute new or revised goals and programs. This is as true in India with its islands of affluence amidst a sea of poverty, as it is in the United States with its pockets of poverty in almost university plenty."&nbsp;''<br/> &nbsp;  
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*Hagerty, Colleen. "These moms were homeless. Now they are starting a housing revolution." ''The Lily'' (''Washington Post''), 6 February 2020. https://www.thelily.com/these-moms-were-homeless-now-they-are-starting-a-housing-revolution/.<br/> &nbsp;
 
*Hailey, Charlie (2003). "Camp(site): architectures of duration and place." Ph.D dissertation, University of Florida, 2003. [https://archive.org/details/campsitearchitec00hail. https://archive.org/details/campsitearchitec00hail.&nbsp;]<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Hailey, Charlie (2003). "Camp(site): architectures of duration and place." Ph.D dissertation, University of Florida, 2003. [https://archive.org/details/campsitearchitec00hail. https://archive.org/details/campsitearchitec00hail.&nbsp;]<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Hailey, Charlie (2008). ''Campsite: Architectures of Duration and Place.'' Louisiana State University Press, 2008.&nbsp;[https://www.amazon.com/Campsite-Architectures-Duration-Place-Voices/dp/080713323X https://www.amazon.com/Campsite-Architectures-Duration-Place-Voices/dp/080713323X].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Hailey, Charlie (2008). ''Campsite: Architectures of Duration and Place.'' Louisiana State University Press, 2008.&nbsp;[https://www.amazon.com/Campsite-Architectures-Duration-Place-Voices/dp/080713323X https://www.amazon.com/Campsite-Architectures-Duration-Place-Voices/dp/080713323X].<br/> &nbsp;  
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*Smith, Doug (2019). "Five winning ideas to build housing more quickly and cheaply for L.A.’s homeless community." Los Angeles Times, Feb 15, 2019. [https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-homeless-housing-innovation-grants-20190215-story.html. https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-homeless-housing-innovation-grants-20190215-story.html.&nbsp;]<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Smith, Doug (2019). "Five winning ideas to build housing more quickly and cheaply for L.A.’s homeless community." Los Angeles Times, Feb 15, 2019. [https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-homeless-housing-innovation-grants-20190215-story.html. https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-homeless-housing-innovation-grants-20190215-story.html.&nbsp;]<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Smock, Kristina (2010). "An Evaluation of Dignity Village." Prepared by Kristina Smock Consulting for the Portland Housing Bureau. February 2010. [https://drive.google.com/file/d/1weO2FSOZVYkxH3Wcb6xdDnFARW5oJnBO/view?usp=sharing [1]].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Smock, Kristina (2010). "An Evaluation of Dignity Village." Prepared by Kristina Smock Consulting for the Portland Housing Bureau. February 2010. [https://drive.google.com/file/d/1weO2FSOZVYkxH3Wcb6xdDnFARW5oJnBO/view?usp=sharing [1]].<br/> &nbsp;  
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*Solomon, Molly. &nbsp;"What Would 'Housing as a Human Right' Look Like in California?" KQED News, 12 Feb 2020. [https://www.kqed.org/news/11801176/what-would-housing-as-a-human-right-look-like-in-california https://www.kqed.org/news/11801176/what-would-housing-as-a-human-right-look-like-in-california].<br/> &nbsp;
 
*Sparks, Tony (2009). As Much Like Home as Possible: Geographies of Homelessness and Citizenship in Seattle’s Tent City 3 (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, 2009). [https://geography.washington.edu/printpdf/research/graduate/tony-sparks-phd https://geography.washington.edu/printpdf/research/graduate/tony-sparks-phd].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Sparks, Tony (2009). As Much Like Home as Possible: Geographies of Homelessness and Citizenship in Seattle’s Tent City 3 (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, 2009). [https://geography.washington.edu/printpdf/research/graduate/tony-sparks-phd https://geography.washington.edu/printpdf/research/graduate/tony-sparks-phd].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Sparks, Tony. "Citizens without property: Informality and political agency in a Seattle, Washington homeless encampment." Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space. September 20, 2016. [https://doi.org/10.1177/0308518X16665360 https://doi.org/10.1177/0308518X16665360].<br/> from Abstract:<br/> ''"This article attempts to broaden and deepen the conversation on informal dwellings in the US by focusing on the tent encampment as a site of creative political agency and experimentation. Drawing upon a body of work referred to by some as “subaltern urbanism”, I examine how everyday practices of camp management produce localized forms of citizenship and governmentality through which “homeless” residents resist stereotypes of pathology and dependence, reclaim their rational autonomy, and recast deviance as negotiable difference in the production of governmental knowledge. Consideration of these practices, I argue, opens up the possibility of a of a view of encampments that foregrounds the agency of the homeless in the production of new political spaces and subjectivities."''<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Sparks, Tony. "Citizens without property: Informality and political agency in a Seattle, Washington homeless encampment." Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space. September 20, 2016. [https://doi.org/10.1177/0308518X16665360 https://doi.org/10.1177/0308518X16665360].<br/> from Abstract:<br/> ''"This article attempts to broaden and deepen the conversation on informal dwellings in the US by focusing on the tent encampment as a site of creative political agency and experimentation. Drawing upon a body of work referred to by some as “subaltern urbanism”, I examine how everyday practices of camp management produce localized forms of citizenship and governmentality through which “homeless” residents resist stereotypes of pathology and dependence, reclaim their rational autonomy, and recast deviance as negotiable difference in the production of governmental knowledge. Consideration of these practices, I argue, opens up the possibility of a of a view of encampments that foregrounds the agency of the homeless in the production of new political spaces and subjectivities."''<br/> &nbsp;  
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*Teige, Karel (1932).&nbsp;''The Minimum Dwelling''. 1932.&nbsp;<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Teige, Karel (1932).&nbsp;''The Minimum Dwelling''. 1932.&nbsp;<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Terner, Ian Donald. "Technology and Autonomy." In [Turner & Fichtel, eds, Freedom to Build, 1972].&nbsp;<br/> [https://drive.google.com/open?id=1t48A9GbiPA44EHcCD7i3S-WotbsZhwj6 https://drive.google.com/open?id=1t48A9GbiPA44EHcCD7i3S-WotbsZhwj6].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Terner, Ian Donald. "Technology and Autonomy." In [Turner & Fichtel, eds, Freedom to Build, 1972].&nbsp;<br/> [https://drive.google.com/open?id=1t48A9GbiPA44EHcCD7i3S-WotbsZhwj6 https://drive.google.com/open?id=1t48A9GbiPA44EHcCD7i3S-WotbsZhwj6].<br/> &nbsp;  
*Tortorello, Michael. "Small World, Big Idea." ''The New York Times'', Feb. 19, 2014. ''https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/garden/small-world-big-idea.html.''<br/> &nbsp;  
+
*Tortorello, Michael. "Small World, Big Idea." ''The New York Times'', Feb. 19, 2014. ''[https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/garden/small-world-big-idea.html https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/garden/small-world-big-idea.html].''<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Tsemberis S. (1999) From Streets to Homes: An Innovative Approach to Supported Housing for Homeless Adults with Psychiatric Disabilities, ''Journal of Community Psychology'' 27(2) pp.225–241. [https://drive.google.com/open?id=1DQyYJZLlx-tn7nwNQ68US7rD3DWQmbAq https://drive.google.com/open?id=1DQyYJZLlx-tn7nwNQ68US7rD3DWQmbAq].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Tsemberis S. (1999) From Streets to Homes: An Innovative Approach to Supported Housing for Homeless Adults with Psychiatric Disabilities, ''Journal of Community Psychology'' 27(2) pp.225–241. [https://drive.google.com/open?id=1DQyYJZLlx-tn7nwNQ68US7rD3DWQmbAq https://drive.google.com/open?id=1DQyYJZLlx-tn7nwNQ68US7rD3DWQmbAq].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Tsemberis, S. (2010a) Housing First: Ending Homelessness, Promoting Recovery and Reducing Costs, in: I. Gould Ellen and B. O’Flaherty (Eds.) ''How to House the Homeless'' (New York: Russell Sage Foundation). [https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45532548_Housing_First_Ending_Homelessness_Promoting_Recovery_and_Reducing_Costs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45532548_Housing_First_Ending_Homelessness_Promoting_Recovery_and_Reducing_Costs].<br/> &nbsp;  
 
*Tsemberis, S. (2010a) Housing First: Ending Homelessness, Promoting Recovery and Reducing Costs, in: I. Gould Ellen and B. O’Flaherty (Eds.) ''How to House the Homeless'' (New York: Russell Sage Foundation). [https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45532548_Housing_First_Ending_Homelessness_Promoting_Recovery_and_Reducing_Costs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45532548_Housing_First_Ending_Homelessness_Promoting_Recovery_and_Reducing_Costs].<br/> &nbsp;  

Latest revision as of 01:23, 13 February 2020

this is the bibliography / references section for Village Buildings book / article collection. 
Currently, it lists all sources as one list, alphabetical by primary author.  Primary government bodies are listed by location name, i.e. "Portland, City of" rather than "City of Portland".