Difference between revisions of "Residential Infill Project"

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(Created page with " program of City of Portland, [https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/ Bureau of Planning and Sustainability] (BPS).    from "[https://www.po...")
 
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[[File:RIP-overview.jpg|600px|thumb|right|Portland's Residential Infill Project]]
  
program of City of [[Portland,_Oregon|Portland]], [https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/ Bureau of Planning and Sustainability] (BPS). 
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program of City of [[Portland,_Oregon|Portland]], [https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/ Bureau of Planning and Sustainability] (BPS), 2015 to present.
  
 
 
 
 
  
from "[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/76592 About the Residential Infill Project]": 
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= Summary =
  
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from [https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/738842 Residential Infill Project Summary: Recommended Draft]" (August 2019). 
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<blockquote>
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''"In order to meet the demands of our growing city and ensure that future generations of Portlanders can live and thrive here, we need to take advantage of our&nbsp;entire&nbsp;housing area.&nbsp; Single-family zones make up 43% of our housing land supply while multi-dwelling zones cover 8%. Our single-family neighborhoods can provide housing options that improve the quality of life for current and future residents – our teachers, bus drivers, retail clerks, construction workers and students. We believe that RIP is one tool to achieve that vision.&nbsp;The&nbsp;[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/67728 Residential Infill Project]&nbsp;has been amended by the Planning and Sustainability Commission to deliver even more smaller scale, less expensive housing in Portland’s single-family neighborhoods. By offering homeowners and home builders the opportunity to create up to four units on a single-dwelling lot (at a smaller scale and height than is currently allowed), the Residential Infill Project allows the return of attractive, popular and more affordable middle housing types to Portland’s residential neighborhoods.''"&nbsp;
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</blockquote>
 
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<blockquote>
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'''One piece of the larger housing affordability puzzle'''<br/> City and regional leaders are addressing the housing crisis on many other fronts, including:
  
In order to meet the demands of our growing city and ensure that future generations of Portlanders can live and thrive here, we need to take advantage of our&nbsp;entire&nbsp;housing area.&nbsp; Single-family zones make up 43% of our housing land supply while multi-dwelling zones cover 8%. Our single-family neighborhoods can provide housing options that improve the quality of life for current and future residents – our teachers, bus drivers, retail clerks, construction workers and students. We believe that RIP is one tool to achieve that vision.&nbsp;The&nbsp;'''[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/67728 Residential Infill Project]&nbsp;'''has been amended by the Planning and Sustainability Commission to deliver even more smaller scale, less expensive housing in Portland’s single-family neighborhoods. By offering homeowners and home builders the opportunity to create up to four units on a single-dwelling lot (at a smaller scale and height than is currently allowed), the Residential Infill Project allows the return of attractive, popular and more affordable middle housing types to Portland’s residential neighborhoods.
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*A $258 million&nbsp;[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/article/597707 affordable housing bond]&nbsp;passed on the November 2016 ballot that will create 1,300 newly affordable homes over the next several years.
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*Newly created revenue streams for affordable housing, such as the&nbsp;[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bds/article/582410 construction excise tax]&nbsp;and the accessory short-term rental fund.
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*Affordable housing incentives for multi-family housing projects through the MULTE program.
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*A collaborative effort to address homelessness through the Joint Office of Homeless Services by connecting thousands of people with housing, employment, health and emergency services.  
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*An&nbsp;[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71274 inclusionary housing program]&nbsp;that requires affordable housing units in new multi-family residential development and provides additional incentives for creating affordable housing units.  
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*New tenant protections, including relocation costs for no-cause evictions or large rent increases.
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</blockquote>
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References
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= References =
  
 
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Portland, City of, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. "[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/76592 About the Residential Infill Project]."&nbsp;
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*Portland, City of, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. "[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/76592 About the Residential Infill Project]."&nbsp;
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*Portland, City of, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. "[https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/738842 Residential Infill Project Summary: Recommended Draft]" (August 2019).&nbsp;

Revision as of 20:45, 10 September 2019

Portland's Residential Infill Project


program of City of Portland, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS), 2015 to present.

 

Summary

from Residential Infill Project Summary: Recommended Draft" (August 2019). 

"In order to meet the demands of our growing city and ensure that future generations of Portlanders can live and thrive here, we need to take advantage of our entire housing area.  Single-family zones make up 43% of our housing land supply while multi-dwelling zones cover 8%. Our single-family neighborhoods can provide housing options that improve the quality of life for current and future residents – our teachers, bus drivers, retail clerks, construction workers and students. We believe that RIP is one tool to achieve that vision. The Residential Infill Project has been amended by the Planning and Sustainability Commission to deliver even more smaller scale, less expensive housing in Portland’s single-family neighborhoods. By offering homeowners and home builders the opportunity to create up to four units on a single-dwelling lot (at a smaller scale and height than is currently allowed), the Residential Infill Project allows the return of attractive, popular and more affordable middle housing types to Portland’s residential neighborhoods.

 

One piece of the larger housing affordability puzzle
City and regional leaders are addressing the housing crisis on many other fronts, including:

  • A $258 million affordable housing bond passed on the November 2016 ballot that will create 1,300 newly affordable homes over the next several years.
  • Newly created revenue streams for affordable housing, such as the construction excise tax and the accessory short-term rental fund.
  • Affordable housing incentives for multi-family housing projects through the MULTE program.
  • A collaborative effort to address homelessness through the Joint Office of Homeless Services by connecting thousands of people with housing, employment, health and emergency services.
  • An inclusionary housing program that requires affordable housing units in new multi-family residential development and provides additional incentives for creating affordable housing units.
  • New tenant protections, including relocation costs for no-cause evictions or large rent increases.

 

 

 


References